These CGI Renders Are Actually Real Photos

by admin January 3, 2017 at 12:21 pm

A Thai flight attendant who was popular on Instagram has deleted her entire account after it was discovered that many of her personal photos were actually faked by inserting herself into stolen background photos.

Is a 52-week photo challenge not enough for you this year? Want a 365-day challenge? If so, there’s now a calendar you should download and print out.

You have no doubt heard of the Golden Ratio, which is somehow or other connected to the Golden Mean and the Fibonacci Spiral, which is oft-touted as the basis of all great compositions. It is less likely that you have heard of the Diamond Ratio.

My original 52 Week Challenge in 2016 was a huge success, with tens of thousands of photographers participating from around the world. In celebration of those who have completed the first challenge, a new challenge is now here!

When photographer Paul Schlemmer started out in photography in his late teens, he spent the first four years studying the subject of light. As he became more proficient, he began sketching lighting diagrams to share how photos were lit and constructed.

Photographer Andy Seliverstoff over St. Petersburg, Russia, has been working on a heartwarming photo project that will put a smile on your face, particularly if you’re a dog lover. It’s titled, “Little Kids and Their Big Dogs.”

These days, more and more of what you think are real photos are actually CGI renderings. But have you seen “CGI renderings” that are actually real photos?

Here’s a solid photo tip: never take a picture that involves someone squatting right next to a wild crocodile. A French woman was injured in Thailand yesterday after she tried to pose for a snapshot next to a large croc.

Another year has come to a close. As we wrap up 2016, here’s a look back at the 10 most popular posts published on PetaPixel over the past 365 days.

These days, more and more of what you think are real photos are actually CGI renderings. But have you seen “CGI renderings” that are actually real photos?

German photographer Christian Schmidt was commissioned last year to shoot a series of photos of the world, from the perspective of Earth itself.

If you’re in the market for a high-end full-frame camera, chances are good the Canon 5D Mark IV, Sony A7R II, and Nikon D810 are all contenders. Check out this side-by-side comparison if you’re having a hard time deciding which of the three is best for you.

Fine Art photographer Lucas Zimmermann’s long exposure photographs of traffic lights in the fog are oddly satisfying. At once creepy and serene, his 2013 series Traffic Lights and this month’s follow-up Traffic Lights 2.0 are both worth checking out.

When photographer Tamás Szarka of Budapest, Hungary, takes his down Strawberry for walks, he often brings a camera to capture the 6-year-old boxer’s crazy facial expressions as she sprints around.

If there is one genre of street photography I specialize in, it is street portraiture. I love talking with my subjects, engaging with them, and focusing on their faces. If I started shooting street portraits all over again, this is the advice I would give myself.

Famous photographers throughout history have produced some incredible images that have stood the test of time, but it’s not only their photographs that are inspirational.
Their acute insights into the creative process have guided generations of photographers and shaped the way even today’s best photographers think about their subjects and scenes.
If you’re stuck for inspiration, or even motivation, we’ve put together 50 quotes from the most inspirational and talented photographers the world has seen to help you get your mojo back.

Artists have long used the golden ratio as a guide for creating aesthetically pleasing art, as it’s believed that the human brain is hardwired to find the proportions inherently beautiful. Take a look at the work of legendary photographer Ansel Adams, and you may find the golden ratio tracing out many of their notable features.

My name is Paul Fehr, and I recently proposed to my girlfriend, Ale, in a photography darkroom. Here’s how I did it.

Magic Lantern may soon release their most popular feature since RAW video. A few of the folks who constantly improve the Canon software add-on have just found a way to generate 14-bit lossless DNG RAW files in-camera!

One hundred and nineteen dollars. That’s it. That’s all you need to open a door to a world of photography previously known only to the most extreme DIYers and commercial photographers for whom purchasing decisions are usually made for them by client requests.

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