Photonomie Lets You Chat in Real Time Using Immersive 360° Photos

by admin April 6, 2016 at 6:08 am

There is a big craze for Sony full frame (FF) mirrorless cameras at the moment, and seeing people rush onto that bandwagon is like watching lemmings following each other over the cliff.

Photographer Peter Stewart is an internationally published photographer who’s also popular on photo sharing sites, boasting tens of thousands of followers and millions of views on 500px, Flickr, and Instagram. Here’s an eye-opening series of his before-and-after post-processing comparisons.

Image recognition is widely used to flag and remove offensive content from social media these days, but sometimes artificial intelligence isn’t very intelligent. One Instagram user just found that out after she had her account disabled for posting a photo of a cake.

Photographer, digital artist, and Photoshop master Erik Johansson just released the behind the scenes video for his latest creation, and you may be surprised when you find out just how much work (not retouching, on-location work) goes into setting up a dreamscape like this.

The photographer Sator has created quite a buzz with his article “Why Sony’s Full Frame Pro Mirrorless Was a Fatal Mistake.” I thought long and hard about whether I should response to this or not. I think there are many things omitted in his analysis and I want to point out some of those points.

Take a moment, rewind back to March of 2012 and remember the buzz that surrounded the release of the Fujifilm X-Pro1. Many of my close photography friends — professionals, casuals, Sony fanboys, and even film shooters — were talking Fuji and discussing how they must have the X-Pro1.

Leica announced back in February that it’s “reinventing” mobile photography by partnering with the Chinese smartphone giant Huawei. We soon got a glimpse of a leaked Huawei P9 phone with dual, supposedly Leica-made, cameras. Now the company has confirmed it: the upcoming Huawei P9 was created with Leica.

Our quest to improve dogs’ standing in the world of photography continues today thanks to an awesome photo series by LA-based photographer Lara Jo Regan that’s bound to put a smile on your face. The series is called “Dogs in Cars,” and if you like what you see you’ll be happy to know that it’s being made available as a 2014 calendar.

Gap is apologizing this week after a photo in its new Gap Kids ad campaign sparked controversy for a “racially insensitive” pose. The photo shows a white child model resting her arm on a black child’s head.

The pursuit of a “unique” shot is an obsession for some, not the least of all because many people think unique photos no longer exist. Everything, they say, has been done. Well… not everything.

God of Lighting, Lighting Rock Star, the late great Dean Collins has been called many things, and all of them point to the fact that he knew light better than, perhaps, anybody else you’ve ever studied under.

Victoria Yore and Terrence Drysdale are a couple made in photography heaven. The first is a beautiful model, the second a talented portrait, landscape, and travel photographer, and together they’ve created a series of wanderlust-inspiring images that are going viral.

It’s a few days late for outlandish April Fools’ jokes, but that won’t stop us from taking this next rumor with a big grain of salt. The Sony a7RII’s successor may, it seems, come to market toting a 70-80MP sensor… take that Canon!

Exploring and photographing abandoned houses always comes with its share of surprises. It also often confronts you with some moral questions and scenarios — there are many “what if’s” that can be associated with this hobby.

What can I say? I’m a sucker for the underdog. My first real underdog came in the form of a 1973 VW Beetle that my Dad bought for me when I turned 15. After we pushed it up the driveway, he gave me a repair manual and told me I had a year to get it going if I wanted wheels.

It came out first in 1940, when Europe was plunged into war but America was enjoying the dying days of calm before the storm. It was Kodak’s new black-and-white film, designed to be shot on location. The only problem was, it was only available in large format.

A few months ago, I published a podcast called The Photographers Conflict which addressed some of the conflicts that photographers seem to have with each other.

Whoa. Google just announced that it’s making its Nik Collection of desktop photo editing software 100% free.

My name is Jason Rosenthal, and I’m the CEO of Lytro. A little over a year ago, it became clear to me that we needed to drastically change the direction of our company.

Last week, Google dropped a bombshell when the company decided to give the Nik Collection of desktop photo editing plugins away for free—no catch, no strings attached, 100% free. But what if you have no idea how to use your newly-acquired suite of editing tools? No worries, Tim Grey has you covered.

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