Here’s How Much Photoshop Hotkeys Can Speed Up Your Workflow

by admin June 29, 2016 at 8:41 am

Ted Forbes of The Art of Photography made this 7.5-minute video in which he talks about a brutal truth of photography: the fact that “nobody is interested in seeing your photographs. Nobody cares about the work that you’re doing as a photographer.”

What is the best camera for street photography? What do you recommend? That is the question I get asked most.

What unusual tactics do you have for nailing the perfect portrait? Over in East Asia, a set of viral photos circulating on the Web shows what some wedding photographers are doing to get the shot they’re picturing in their minds.

I’m old. Believe me, I know it. I’ll be 70 in a few months. That fact may make it hard for you to take me seriously, but bear with me for just this post. With age comes wisdom, right? What I want to write here is that I think the field of photography by those making art is changing in a disturbing way. Read on.

“D” is digital. “X” is cool and mysterious. And “1” is, well, number one. Since the introduction of the Nikon D1x, camera manufacturers have been riffing on these three letters. Canon has their 1D X, and most recently Hasselblad introduced the X1D. But how do all these cameras compare?

About a year ago, Levi Bettwieser of the Rescued Film Project won about 20 auctions for the undeveloped work of a 1950s photographer. What he received was 66 bundles of film containing a staggering 1,200 unprocessed rolls.

There’s something incredibly touching about a photograph of a mother-to-be cradling her belly and gazing sweetly at her unborn child. Unfortunately, thanks to these beer ads, you’re never going to be able to look at those photos the same way again.

Artist Chris Fraser creates beautiful light displays by turning rooms into giant camera obscuras. Rather than use a single pinhole as the lens, he bores numerous holes into the walls to create layered patterns of light. He writes,

My light installations use the ‘camera obscura’ as a point of departure. They are immersive optical environments, idealized spaces with discreet openings. In translating the outside world into moving fields of light and color, the projections make an argument for unfixed notion of sight.

Fisheye lenses are often considered a ‘no-no’ among professional landscape and cityscape photographers. People see them as not much more than a gimmick. I often hear complaints about fisheye lenses because of ‘that ugly distortion’.

Rebecca Ariane Givens. You may not have heard her name before, but there’s a very good chance you’ve seen her face. She’s one of the most popular models for stock photography, and her pictures have been used all across the world for all kinds of purposes.

How has Hollywood’s idea of female beauty changed over the past century? Here’s a collection of averaged portraits that tries to answer that question.

The exciting new Hasselblad X1D launched with two prime lenses—a 45mm and 90mm—and a third (30mm) in the works. But if you’re hoping the fourth XCD lens will be a zoom, you’re out of luck. Hassy says a practical zoom lens for a camera like the X1D is “almost impossible theoretically.”

Google Maps and Google Earth just got a whole lot sharper thanks to NASA and its Landsat 8 satellite. Using beautiful high-res imagery captured by the new satellite, Google has built a better high-res cloud-free mosaic of the world based on some 700 trillion pixels of data.

A lot of people have asked us why we only shoot “Victoria’s back” and why we rarely ever show her face. Believe it or not, we actually have a reason why we shoot a lot of faceless imagery, and we wanted to write it down, once and for all, so you can reference it any time you want.

Exploring the former house-monument of the Bulgarian Communist Party is one of the most exciting explorations I have ever done.

So you want to learn to take stacked images like the one above? Great! You’ve come to the right place — just read on.

The Kennel Club, the official kennel club of the UK and the oldest kennel club in the world, has just announced the winning photos for the Dog Photographer of the Year 2015 contest, the largest dog photography competition in the world.

The U.S. Marine Corps has officially corrected photographic history this week. After a formal investigation, the Corps is admitting that one of the men in AP photographer Joe Rosenthal’s iconic WWII photograph “Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima” has been misidentified for the past 71 years.

I will begin by saying that my intention is not to attack Steve McCurry or defame him in any manner. It is only an attempt to clear certain facts that have come to light regarding his work and to also raise certain questions on aspects that may or may not have been missed, but certainly have not been expressed till now… at least not publicly.

Imagine getting off a flight, walking over to get your (unwillingly) gate-checked case full of $20K of camera gear, and seeing a baggage handler walking up holding a few lenses and yelling “whose are these?” That’s exactly what happened to photographer Yosef Shidler of CJ Studios.

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